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  • Have:119
  • Want:43
  • Avg Rating:3.82 / 5
  • Ratings:22
  • Last Sold:
  • Lowest:$5.99
  • Median:$11.54
  • Highest:$18.05

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    SkoldAnomie

    Skold - Anomie album cover

    Label:Metropolis – MET 710
    Format:
    CD, Album
    Country:US
    Released:
    Genre:Electronic
    Style:Industrial

    Tracklist

    1(This Is My) Elephant5:02
    2Suck3:36
    3Black Out4:03
    4Angel Of Noise4:00
    5Satellite4:12
    6Becoming4:05
    7The Hunger3:41
    8Here Comes The Thunder4:44
    9And Then We Die5:02
    10Miserably Never Ever4:49
    11Tonight3:47
    12What You See Is What You Get4:58
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    Credits

    Notes

    First 1111 pre-orders come with a hand numbered signed limited edition card from Skold.

    Barcode and Other Identifiers

    • Barcode: 782388071024
    • Matrix / Runout: Z102398 DF MET 80710-2 TEXT 01

    Other Versions (5)

    View All
    Title (Format)LabelCat#CountryYear
    Anomie (14×File, AAC, Album, Deluxe Edition)MetropolisMET 9710DUS2011
    Anomie (CD, Album)Dependent Recordsmind 184Germany2011
    Anomie (12×File, MP3, Album, 256 kbps)MetropolisnoneUS2011
    Anomie (14×File, MP3, Album, Deluxe Edition, 256 kbps)MetropolisnoneUS2011
    Anomie (12×File, FLAC, Album)MetropolisnoneUS2011

    Reviews

    • Somnium_Obmutum's avatar
      Edited 9 months ago
      A traditional punk album with an industrial cherry on top. I mean... it's mostly a guilty pleasure, especially if you compare them with the old albums by Skold and some of the newer ones which are mostly good. If you are sophisticated it will seem to you as unbearably tabloid, predictable, unnecessarily rude at the beginning (in terms of the lyrics), but once you place it on the appropriate scales, you can see a certain charm in this, even a nostalgic element of a long-forgotten irreconcilable masculinity, so to speak. Caustic motives of self-affirmation here quickly flow into harmless street boy's wisdom and then to the anarchy promised in the title, though domestic of course. The guitar parts are consistently skillful. Individual tracks, even though there are about two or three of that type, can surprise a little bit - whether it's "The Hunger" with it's country rock aesthetics (probably the most beautiful guitar part in Tim's career) or the unexpectedly melancholic ending in the final "What You See Is What You Get".

      D!XI